Home | About Us | Editorial Board | Current Issue | Archives | Search | Instructions | Subscription | Feedback | e-Alerts | Login 
Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry Official publication of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry
 Users Online: 2145  
 
  Print this page Email this page   Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2007  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 15-19
 

Status of oral health awareness in Indian children as compared to Western children: A thought provoking situation (A pilot study)


Department of Pedodontia and Preventive Dentistry, Punjab Govt. Dental College and Hospital, Amritsar, India

Correspondence Address:
Manpreet Kaur
Department of Pedodontia and Preventive Dentistry, Punjab Govt. Dental College and Hospital, Amritsar
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-4388.31983

Rights and Permissions

 

   Abstract 

A study was conducted to evaluate the level of oral health awareness in a selected sample of Indian children and a selected sample of western children residing in Amritsar city of Punjab. Children were evaluated on the basis of a standardized questionnaire developed by WHO, for health awareness in children. Final results revealed the level of awareness in both the groups and the practical application of their knowledge about dental health in day to day life.


Keywords: Dental health awareness, dietary habits oral hygiene practices


How to cite this article:
Grewal N, Kaur M. Status of oral health awareness in Indian children as compared to Western children: A thought provoking situation (A pilot study). J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent 2007;25:15-9

How to cite this URL:
Grewal N, Kaur M. Status of oral health awareness in Indian children as compared to Western children: A thought provoking situation (A pilot study). J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent [serial online] 2007 [cited 2019 Aug 21];25:15-9. Available from: http://www.jisppd.com/text.asp?2007/25/1/15/31983



   Introduction Top


Health is a universal human need for all cultural groups. General health cannot be attained or maintained without oral health. The mouth is regarded as the mirror of the body and the gateway to good health.

Today, various types of oral health maintenance materials have been used and countless numbers of dental health information programs have been conducted in schools and other settings. [1],[2],[3],[4],[5] However, these efforts will not succeed in influencing the behavior until people are not aware of the importance of oral health. So, attainment of good oral health is based upon the awareness of good dietary habits and oral hygiene practices.

Individuals become aware of anything new by showing interest in knowing more about it and evaluating advantages and disadvantages to put that new idea or method in practice. Finally the individual accepts the idea as beneficial to him by practicing it in principle.

Is awareness enough to achieve good oral health unless, it is practiced ideally by the target population?

Although imparting oral health education begins from the footstep of awareness, evaluation of its implementation is an important indicator of the success of the education imparted.

Therefore, in the present study, an attempt was made to evaluate and compare oral health awareness in Indian and western children and existing oral health practices in both the groups.

Selection of sample

A total of 200 children were randomly selected from two different schools and grouped as Group I and II.

Group I: 100 Indian children studying in the senior study school at Putli-Ghar Amritsar.

Group II: 100 non-resident American children studying at Sikh Dharma at Miri-Piri Academy, Chheharta, Amritsar.

The selected subjects were between the ages of 11 and 16 years. The socio-economic status and literacy level of the parents of the Indian children were important criteria for selecting the Indian sample.


   Method of Study Top


Children participated in personal interviews conducted on the basis of a standardized questionnaire developed by WHO, for health awareness in children. The questionnaire included 12 questions regarding individual views of children on their own:

  • Oral health status
  • Dental care
  • Oral health practices
  • Dietary habits
  • Parental education



   Results and Discussion Top


A total of 200 children participated in personal interviews conducted on the basis of a standardized questionnaire developed by WHO, for health awareness in children. Turning to more quantitative part of the analysis of the study, we have the following information. When the children were asked regarding the health of their teeth and gums, 28% of American children described it as excellent as compared to 6% of the Indian group. Moreover, 16% of Indian children were not aware of the status of their own teeth and gums [Table - 1],[Table - 2],[Table - 3],[Table - 4],[Table - 5],[Table - 6],[Table - 7],[Table - 8],[Table - 9],[Table - 10].

Regarding the frequency and reason for the visit to the dentist, it was found that 35% of the Indian children never visited the dentist as compared to 11% of American children in the past 12 months. About 17% of Indian children responded that only when they had discomfort or pain they were taken to the dentist by their parents. On the other hand 45% of American children's visit was initiated by the dentist for routine recall or by parents for general preventive check-up.

There was also significant difference in oral hygiene practices in both the groups. About the frequency of brushing, 60% the American children brushed twice a day and 47% of Indian children brushed once a day. There were some (3%) who brushed once a week in Indian group.

Though the awareness regarding the fluoridated toothpaste was comparable between the two groups, the consistency of use was not same in the both groups.

More than half (54%) of the American children were flossing regularly where as less than 1/7 th (15%) of the Indian children flossed regularly.

Dietary habits of both the groups were comparable, which goes to show the effect of urbanization on the Indian children.


   Conclusion Top


The Indian group showed low level of oral health awareness and practice as compared to the western group although both the groups show comparable eating habits. The influence of urbanization and modern food habits have certainly made the Indian children at par with the western children, but their oral hygiene practices have not changed with changing times. On the other hand the western children were more aware of regular visits to the dentist because it was initiated either by the dentist or the parents. Such an effort on the part of the parents was predominantly missing in the Indian children. This study initiates a thought provoking response from our dental health educators and providers who although repeatedly carry out dental camps for oral health awareness, do not go back to reassess the impact and the outcome of their programs on their target population.

 
   References Top

1.Al-qtaibi M, Angmar-Mansson B. Oral hygiene habits and oral health awareness among urban Saudi Arabians. Oral Health Prev Dent 2004;2:389-96.  Back to cited text no. 1    
2.Mayer MP, de Paiva Buischi Y, de Oliveira LB, Gjermo O. Long-term effect of an oral hygiene training program on knowledge and reported behavior. Oral Health Prev Dent 2003;1:37-43.   Back to cited text no. 2  [PUBMED]  
3.El-Qaderi SS, Taani DQ. Oral Health knowledge and dental health practices among school children in Jerash district Jordan. Int J Dent Hyg 2004;2:78-85.  Back to cited text no. 3    
4.d'Almeida HB, Kagami N, Maki Y, Takaesu Y. Self-reported oral hygiene habits, health knowledge and sources of oral health information in a group of Japanese junior high school students. Bull Tokyo Dent Coll 1997;38:123-31.  Back to cited text no. 4    
5.Golbarani JF, Pack AR. Knowledge, awareness and use of interdental cleaning aids by dental school patients in New Zealand. JNZ Soc Periodontol 1994;78:7-16.  Back to cited text no. 5    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table - 1], [Table - 2], [Table - 3], [Table - 4], [Table - 5], [Table - 6], [Table - 7], [Table - 8], [Table - 9], [Table - 10]


This article has been cited by
1 Bridging the gap: Addressing challenges toward improvement of cleft teamwork in a tertiary care center in North India: A pilot study
Moghe, G. and Mauli, S. and Thomas, A. and Obed, V.A.E.
Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal. 2013; 50(4): 473-480
[Pubmed]
2 Bridging the Gap: Addressing Challenges Toward Improvement of Cleft Teamwork in a Tertiary Care Center in North India: A Pilot Study
Gayatri Moghe,Simratvir Mauli,Abi Thomas,Vijay A.E. Obed
The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal. 2013; 50(4): 473
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
3 Impact of oral health education on oral hygiene knowledge, practices, plaque control and gingival health of 13- to 15-year-old school children in Bangalore city
International Journal of Dental Hygiene. 2013; 11(2): 126
[VIEW] | [DOI]
4 Parental knowledge, attitudes and cultural beliefs regarding oral health and dental care of preschool
N. Chhabra,A. Chhabra
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry. 2012; 13(2): 76
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
5 Parental knowledge, attitudes and cultural beliefs regarding oral health and dental care of preschool children in an Indian population: A quantitative study
Chhabra, N. and Chhabra, A.
European Archives of Paediatric Dentistry. 2012; 13(2): 76-82
[Pubmed]
6 30 Years of dental research in Australia and India: A comparative analysis of published peer review literature
Madan, C. and Kruger, E. and Tennant, M.
Indian Journal of Dental Research. 2012; 23(2): 293
[Pubmed]
7 Oral health-related knowledge, attitude, and practices among 12-year-old schoolchildren studying in rural areas of Panchkula, India
Mehta, A. and Kaur, G.
Indian Journal of Dental Research. 2012; 23(2): 293
[Pubmed]
8 Oral Health Awareness in Croatian and Italian Urban Adolescents [Svijest O Oralnom Zdravlju U Hrvatskih I Talijanskih Adolescenata]
Čuković-Bagić, I. and Dumančić, J. and Nuzzolese, E. and Marušić, M. and Lepore, M.M.
Collegium Antropologicum. 2012; 36(1): 221-226
[Pubmed]
9 Multilevel analysis of the use of oral health services by the pediatric population [Análisis multinivel del uso de servicios de salud bucodental por población infanto-juvenil]
Barriuso Lapresa, L. and Sanz Barbero, B.
Gaceta Sanitaria. 2011; 25(5): 391-396
[Pubmed]
10 Tooth cleaning frequency in relation to socio-demographic variables and personal hygiene measures among school children of Udaipur district, India
Kumar, S. and Panwar, J. and vyas, A. and Sharma, J. and Goutham, B. and Duraiswamy, P. and Kulkarni, S.
International Journal of Dental Hygiene. 2011; 9(1): 3-8
[Pubmed]
11 Anlisis multinivel del uso de servicios de salud bucodental por poblacin infanto-juvenil
Laura Barriuso Lapresa, Beln Sanz Barbero
Gaceta Sanitaria. 2011;
[VIEW] | [DOI]
12 Tooth cleaning frequency in relation to socio-demographic variables and personal hygiene measures among school children of Udaipur district, India
S Kumar,J Panwar,A vyas,J Sharma,B Goutham,P Duraiswamy,S Kulkarni
International Journal of Dental Hygiene. 2011; 9(1): 3
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
13 The focus group technique as a method of evaluating teenager knowledge of oral health [Técnica do grupo focal como método de avaliação do conhecimento de adolescentes sobre saúde bucal]
Francisco, K.M.S. and Sundefeld, M.L.M.M. and Garbin, A.J.Í. and Garbin, C.A.S.
Acta Scientiarum - Health Sciences. 2009; 31(2): 165-170
[Pubmed]
14 Evaluation of oral health awareness in parents of preschool children
Kaur, B.
Indian Journal of Dental Research. 2009; 20(4): 463-465
[Pubmed]
15 Oral health-related KAP among 11- to 12-year-old school children in a government-aided missionary school of Bangalore city
Harikiran, A., Pallavi, S., Hariprakash, S., Ashutosh, Nagesh, K.
Indian Journal of Dental Research. 2008; 19(3): 236-242
[Pubmed]



 

Top
Print this article  Email this article
Previous article Next article

    

 
  Search
 
   Next article
   Previous article 
   Table of Contents
  
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
    Article in PDF (133 KB)
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  


    Abstract
    Introduction
    Method of Study
    Results and Disc...
    Conclusion
    References
    Article Tables

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed10894    
    Printed217    
    Emailed5    
    PDF Downloaded872    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 15    

Recommend this journal


Contact us | Sitemap | Advertise | What's New | Copyright and Disclaimer 
  2005 - Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow 
Online since 1st May '05