Home | About Us | Editorial Board | Current Issue | Archives | Search | Instructions | Subscription | Feedback | e-Alerts | Login 
Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry Official publication of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry
 Users Online: 2183  
 
  Print this page Email this page   Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2007  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 86-87
 

Comparative evaluation for microleakage between Fuji-VII glass ionomer cement and light-cured unfilled resin: A combined in vivo in vitro study


Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Constituent Institution of Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE), Mangalore, India

Correspondence Address:
R Ashwin
'Seetha', Ashoknagar, Mangalore - 575 006, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-4388.33454

Rights and Permissions

 

   Abstract 

Glass ionomer cement, besides being used as restorative material, can also be used as pit and fissure sealant. The use of glass ionomer cement as pit and fissure sealant has added benefit by its fluoride-releasing property that results in increased resistance of the fissures to demineralize. The capacity of a sealant to prevent microleakage into the fissure is important, since microleakage may initiate and support a carious lesion beneath the sealant. The study was carried out to compare marginal microleakage between Fuji-VII glass ionomer cement (G C Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and the conventional light-cured unfilled resin as pit and fissure sealants (3M Concise, 3M Dental Products, St. Paul, USA).
The dye used was 2% methylene blue (Qualigens Fine Chemicals, Mumbai, India). The teeth were sectioned and studied under the stereomicroscope. The result revealed that there was no difference in microleakage ( P > 0.05) between the two materials.


Keywords: Fissure sealant, Fuji-VII glass ionomer, light-cured unfilled resin, microleakage, pit


How to cite this article:
Ashwin R, Arathi R. Comparative evaluation for microleakage between Fuji-VII glass ionomer cement and light-cured unfilled resin: A combined in vivo in vitro study. J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent 2007;25:86-7

How to cite this URL:
Ashwin R, Arathi R. Comparative evaluation for microleakage between Fuji-VII glass ionomer cement and light-cured unfilled resin: A combined in vivo in vitro study. J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent [serial online] 2007 [cited 2019 Dec 7];25:86-7. Available from: http://www.jisppd.com/text.asp?2007/25/2/86/33454



   Introduction Top


The introduction of glass ionomer cement to dentistry was mainly as a restorative, luting and lining material. [1] Fissure sealing with glass ionomer cement was first introduced by Mclean and Wilson in 1974. [2]

The important advantage of using glass ionomer cement as a pit and fissure sealant is the fluoride release which results in increased resistance of the fissures to demineralization. This fluoride release continues even when the sealants appear to have been lost clinically because of the remnants left at the bottom of the fissures. [3],[4],[5],[6] Studies carried out by Hatibovic and Kofman [7] showed increased concentration of fluoride in saliva for as long as 1 year after placement of glass ionomer restorations. It has been claimed by the manufacturers that Fuji-VII glass ionomer cement releases six times the fluoride as compared to other high-strength glass ionomer cements and can be used as a pit and fissure sealant.

Considering the difficulty in obtaining isolation in children and the multiple steps involved in the placement of unfilled resins, glass ionomer cement can be quickly and easily placed into the pits and fissures.

The present study was conducted to evaluate and compare the microleakage of Fuji-VII glass ionomer cement and light-cured unfilled resins when used as pit and fissure sealants.


   Materials and Methods Top


The study was carried out in the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry at Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore.

The sample size consisted of 16 primary noncarious lower second molars selected from children aged between 10 and 12 years. Radiographs were recorded to evaluate the presence and stage of development of the underlying second premolars. Informed consent was obtained from the parents.

Air-Water spray was used to clean the fissures. The samples were divided into two groups of eight each:

Group 1: To be sealed with Fuji-VII glass ionomer cement

(G C Corporation, Tokyo, Japan)

Group 2: To be sealed with light-cured unfilled resin

(3M Concise, 3M Dental Products, St. Paul, USA).

The two materials were placed on the selected teeth randomly. Both the materials were placed according to the manufacturers' instructions.

The teeth were extracted after 14 days. All the extracted teeth were cleaned with hand instruments and stored in normal saline.

The teeth were subjected to thermocycling for 125 cycles at temperatures of 5°C ± 2°C and 50°C ± 2°C with a dwell time of 15 seconds. The apices of the teeth were covered with Fuji-VII glass ionomer cement (G C Corporation, Tokyo Japan). The teeth were covered completely with nail varnish except for the area within 2 mm of the sealant varnish interface. The teeth were then mounted on acrylic blocks extending till the bifurcation area.

This was followed by the immersion of the teeth in 2% methylene dye (Qualigens Fine Chemicals, Mumbai, India) for 48 hours. After removal from the dye solution, they were cleaned and rinsed with tap water. The teeth were sectioned longitudinally in buccolingual direction with a double-faced diamond disc (K G Sorensen Ind e Com Ltd.) and two sections were obtained from each of the teeth.

The sections were then studied under a stereomicroscope to measure the depth of dye penetration from the sealant surface and the cavosurface margins. All the scoring was carried out by a single person and the scoring criteria used for the study was as follows:

0 = No dye penetration

1 = Dye penetration from the sealant and between the sealant and tooth into enamel only

2 = Dye penetration from the sealant and between the sealant tooth interface into enamel and dentin

3 = Dye penetration from the sealant and between the sealant tooth interface into the pulp chamber

The scores were tabulated, interpreted and statistically analyzed [Table - 1].


   Results Top


All the 16 samples were evaluated. Scores of dye penetration mean and standard deviations were calculated.

[Table - 1] summarizes the microleakage scores, the mean and standard deviations for the two groups. Standard statistical analysis, namely, Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison between the groups. The result was statistically insignificant ( P > 0.05) [Table - 2].


   Discussion Top


The study was carried out to evaluate the microleakage between Fuji-VII glass ionomer cement and the conventional light-cured unfilled resin when used as pit and fissure sealants. Since a clinical evaluation of the glass ionomer material was desired, the study was done on primary second lower molars in children aged between 10 and 12 years.

Traditionally, glass ionomer cements are not used as pit and fissure sealants due to the notion of increased microleakage. [1] But the results showed no difference in microleakage between the two materials, indicating that the sealing ability of glass ionomer cement is comparatively similar to the conventional unfilled resins, with additional benefit of fluoride release.

The increased resistance to microleakage in Fuji-VII glass ionomer cements can be explained on the basis of:

  • Conditioning done before application
  • Chemical adherence to the tooth
  • Protection with an enamel bond agent after application
  • Absence of resin in spite of the dual cure system, so no polymerization shrinkage



   Conclusion Top


The pink-colored Fuji-VII glass ionomer cement could be a promising material as a pit and fissure sealant due to its added fluoride release compared to the conventional unfilled resin, but independent long-term clinical data, especially concerning retention, would be beneficial.

 
   References Top

1.Ovrebo RC, Raadal M. Microleakage in fissures sealed with resin or glass ionomer cement. Scand J Dent Res 1990;98:66-9.  Back to cited text no. 1    
2.Mejare I, Mjor IA. Glass ionomer cement and resin based fissure sealants: A clinical study. Scand J Dent Res 1990;98:345-50.  Back to cited text no. 2    
3.Seppa L, Forss H. Resistance of occlusal fissures to demineralization after loss of glass ionomer sealants in vitro. Pediatr Dent 1991;13:39-42.  Back to cited text no. 3    
4.Kupietzky A, Houpt M, Mellberg J, Shey Z. Fluoride exchange from glass ionomer restorations. Pediatr Dent 1994;16:340-5.  Back to cited text no. 4  [PUBMED]  
5.Karlzen-Reuterving G, van Dijken JW. A 3 year follow up of glass ionomer cement and resin based fissure sealants. ASDC J Dent Child 1995;62:108-10.  Back to cited text no. 5    
6.Arrow P, Riordan PJ. Retention and caries preventive effects of a GIC and a resin-based fissure sealant. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 1995;23:282-5.  Back to cited text no. 6  [PUBMED]  
7.Hatibovic-Kofman S, Koch G. Fluoride release from glass ionomer cement in vivo in vitro. Swed Dent J 1991;15:253-8.  Back to cited text no. 7    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table - 1], [Table - 2]


This article has been cited by
1 Fluoride ion release from glass ionomer cements before and after recharge and surface protection [Avaliação da liberação de íon fluoreto de cimentos ionoméricos antes e após a recarga e com proteção da superfície]
Antunes, D.P. and Antunes, D.P. and Matos, R.C. and Kamozaki, M.B.B. and Pagani, C. and Salgado, I.O.
Pesquisa Brasileira em Odontopediatria e Clinica Integrada. 2013; 13(1): 61-67
[Pubmed]
2 Clinical comparison of Fuji VII and a resin sealant in children at high and low risk of caries
Chen, X.X. and Liu, X.G.
Dental Materials Journal. 2013; 32(3): 512-518
[Pubmed]
3 A two-year clinical evaluation of glass ionomer and ormocer based fissure sealants
Guler, C. and Yilmaz, Y.
Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry. 2013; 37(3): 263-268
[Pubmed]
4 Clinical comparison of Fuji VII and a resin sealant in children at high and low risk of caries
Xiao xian CHEN,Xing gang LIU
Dental Materials Journal. 2013; 32(3): 512
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
5 Assessment and comparison of microleakage of a fluoride-releasing sealant after acid etching and Er: YAG laser treatment - An in vitro study
R Vijayaraghavan,VArun Prasad Rao,NVenugopal Reddy,R Krishnakumar,DK Sugumaran,G Mohan
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry. 2012; 3(1): 64
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
6 Clinical evaluation of various recently used pit and fissure sealants: A12month study
Mathur, S. and Pandit, I.K. and Srivatava, N. and Gugnani, N. and Gupta, M.
International Journal of Clinical Dentistry. 2012; 5(3): 253-262
[Pubmed]
7 Twenty-four month clinical evaluation of fissure sealants on partially erupted permanent first molars: Glass ionomer versus resin-based sealant
Antonson, S.A. and Antonson, D.E. and Brener, S. and Crutchfield, J. and Larumbe, J. and Michaud, C. and Yazici, A.R. and Hardigan, P.C. and Alempour, S. and Evans, D. and Ocanto, R.
Journal of the American Dental Association. 2012; 143(2): 115-122
[Pubmed]
8 Marginal microleakage of triage sealant under different moisture contamination
Peng, Y. and Stark, P.C. and Rich, A. and Loo, C.Y.
Pediatric Dentistry. 2011; 33(3): 203-206
[Pubmed]
9 Effect of salivacontamination onmicroleakage of threedifferent pit and fissuresealants
Topaloglu Ak, A. and Alpoz, A.R.
European Journal of Paediatric Dentistry. 2010; 11(1): 93-96
[Pubmed]
10 Conversion degree, microhardness, microleakage and fluoride release of different fissure sealants
Kuşgöz, A., Tüzüner, T., Ülker, M., Kemer, B., Saray, O.
Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials. 2010; 3(8): 594-599
[Pubmed]
11 Effect of blood contamination on microleakage of orthodontic bracket bonding materials
Shi, Y.-T. and Pin, Y. and Shan, L.-H. and Song, J.-S.
Journal of Clinical Rehabilitative Tissue Engineering Research. 2009; 13(29): 5649-5652
[Pubmed]
12 Predisposing factors and prevalence of fractured anterior teeth among 12 and 16 years old school malaysian children
Gopinath, V. and Ling, K. and Haziani, K. and Ismail, N.
Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry. 2008; 33(1): 39-42
[Pubmed]
13 Fuji III vs. Fuji VII glass ionomer sealants - A clinical study
Kamala, B. and Hegde, A.
Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry. 2008; 33(1): 29-33
[Pubmed]



 

Top
Print this article  Email this article
Previous article Next article

    

 
  Search
 
   Next article
   Previous article 
   Table of Contents
  
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
    Article in PDF (118 KB)
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  


    Abstract
    Introduction
    Materials and Me...
    Results
    Discussion
    Conclusion
    References
    Article Tables

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed11569    
    Printed186    
    Emailed8    
    PDF Downloaded1187    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 13    

Recommend this journal


Contact us | Sitemap | Advertise | What's New | Copyright and Disclaimer 
 © 2005 - Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow 
Online since 1st May '05