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CASE REPORT
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 68-70
 

Posterior neonatal teeth


Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, New Delhi, India

Date of Web Publication23-Apr-2011

Correspondence Address:
A Kumar
Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, BSZ Marg, MAMC Complex, New Delhi - 110 002
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-4388.79948

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   Abstract 

Teeth which are present in the oral cavity of newborn infant at the time of birth are called "natal teeth" and which erupts in first month of postnatal life are called as "neonatal teeth." The incidence of these teeth is 1 in 2000 to 1 in 3500 live birth. The most common natal teeth reported are mandibular central incisors followed by maxillary incisors and mandibular canine. The natal or neonatal tooth in maxillary molar region is a rare occurrence. This article represents a rare case of bilateral neonatal maxillary molar teeth.


Keywords: Molars, maxillary arch, neonatal teeth


How to cite this article:
Kumar A, Grewal H, Verma M. Posterior neonatal teeth. J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent 2011;29:68-70

How to cite this URL:
Kumar A, Grewal H, Verma M. Posterior neonatal teeth. J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent [serial online] 2011 [cited 2019 Oct 17];29:68-70. Available from: http://www.jisppd.com/text.asp?2011/29/1/68/79948



   Introduction Top


The teeth which are present in the oral cavity of newly born infants either at the time of birth or erupt soon after birth have been reported since 23 BC. [1] Various terms have also been used to designate these teeth like congenital teeth, fetal teeth, predeciduous teeth, premature teeth, precociously erupted teeth, and dentitia praecox. [2],[3] Massler and Savara [4] defined these teeth as natal and neonatal teeth. The teeth which are present at birth designated as natal while those erupt within 30 days after birth as neonatal teeth.

The exact etiology of natal and neonatal teeth is not known. Various factors have been suggested by many authors e.g. familial pattern like hereditary transmission of a dominant autosomal gene, [5] superficial position of tooth germ, [6] endocrine disturbances, [7] osteoblastic activity in area of the tooth germ 5 , infection or malnutrition, [8] febrile status, [7],[9] hypovitaminosis [10] and syndromic association [11],[12] like Hallerman-Streiff syndrome,  Ellis-van Creveld syndrome More Details, Craniofacial dysostosis, etc.

The incidence of natal teeth ranges from 1:2000 to 1:3500 live birth. [1],[5],[8] Bodenhoff [8] reported the incidence of natal and neonatal teeth as 0.3- 0.5%. These teeth are more common in the mandibular arch than the maxillary arch and are more common in the incisor region than the canine and molar region. The 85% of natal and neonatal teeth found in the mandibular incisor region, 11% in maxillary incisor region, 3% in mandibular canine region, and 1% in maxillary canine and molar region. [4] A neonatal tooth in maxillary molar region is a rare finding and this article represents a case of bilateral neonatal maxillary molars.


   Case Report Top


A 3-month-old female Muslim child was brought to the Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, New Delhi, India, with a chief complaint of early eruption of few teeth and crying of child especially at the time of feeding. Mother gave a history of consanguineous marriage. Medical history was non-contributory. Mother of child told that they noticed these teeth around 2 months back.

On intra-oral examination, the teeth present were deciduous maxillary right first molar (54) and deciduous maxillary left first and second molars (64 and 65) [Figure 1] and [Figure 2]. The deciduous maxillary left second molar was excessively mobile, just hanging with gingival tissue causing discomfort to nursing mother and also to the child. On soft tissue examination there was an inflammation on hard palate. RVG examination [Figure 3] revealed that these teeth were from normal series of deciduous teeth and not the supernumerary. Since there was a potential risk of aspiration and swallowing of deciduous maxillary left second molar, therefore extraction of this tooth was carried out under aseptic conditions. The tooth was rootless [Figure 4].
Figure 1: Neonatal maxillary left first and second molars

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Figure 2: Neonatal maxillary right 1st molar

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Figure 3: RVG

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Figure 4: Extracted neonatal maxillary left second molar

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   Discussion Top


More than 90% of natal and neonatal teeth are prematurely erupted deciduous series of teeth, whereas less than 10% are supernumerary. [5] In the present case these teeth were from normal series of deciduous teeth, but the deciduous maxillary left second molar was highly mobile, so it was extracted keeping in view the risk of aspiration and swallowing. Generally, extraction in newly born infants may cause bleeding problem because the bacterial flora present in the digestive tract of newborn infants may be ineffective in the production of Vitamin K during first 10 days following delivery. Vitamin K plays a major role in the prothrombine synthesis in the liver. Therefore, it is always better to wait 8-10 days after birth for any extraction procedure.

Various etiological factors have been proposed by many authors [5],[6],[7],[9],[10],[11],[12] although the exact etiology is not known. In the present case medical history revealed that mother led a normal pregnancy period and the family history was negative for natal or neonatal teeth. There was an inflammation over the palate that could be because of infection, so infection could be the possible reason for early eruption of teeth in the present case.

 
   References Top

1.Seminario AL, Ivancakova R. Natal and neonatal teeth. Acta Medica (Hradec Kralove) 2004;47:229-33.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Bodenhoff J. Natal and neonatal teeth. J Odontal Tidskr 1959;67:645-95.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Mayhall JT. Natal and neonatal teeth among the Thinget Indian. J Dent Res 1967;46:748-9.  Back to cited text no. 3
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4.Massler M, Savara BS. Natal and neonatal teeth: A review of 24 cases reported in the literature. J Pediatr 1950;36:349-59.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.Kates GA, Needleman HL, Holmes LB. Natal and neonatal teeth: A clinical study. J Am Dent Assoc 1984;109:441-3.  Back to cited text no. 5
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6.Ooshima T, Mihara J, Saito T, Sobue. Eruption of tooth like structure following the extraction of natal tooth: Report of case. J Dent Child 1986;53:275-8.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.Bigeard L, Hemmerle J, Sommermater JI. Clinical and ultra structural study of the natal tooth: Enamel and dentin assessment. J Dent Child 1966;63:23-31.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.Leung AK. Natal teeth. Am J Dis Child 1986;140:249-51.  Back to cited text no. 8
[PUBMED]    
9.Leung AK. Management of natal teeth. J Am Dent Assoc 1987;114:762.  Back to cited text no. 9
    
10.Anderson RA. Natal and neonatal teeth: Histological investigation of two black female. J Dent Child 1982;49:300-3.  Back to cited text no. 10
    
11.Chow MH. Natal and neonatal teeth. J Am Dent Assoc 1980;100:215-6.  Back to cited text no. 11
[PUBMED]    
12.Fonseca MA, Mueller WA. Hallerman-Streiff syndrome: Case report and recommendations for dental care. J Dent Child 1995;61:334-7.  Back to cited text no. 12
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3], [Figure 4]


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