Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry
Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry
                                                   Official journal of the Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry                           
Year : 2008  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 97--101

Comparison of oral ketamine and oral midazolam as sedative agents in pediatric dentistry


SG Damle1, M Gandhi3, V Laheri2 
1 Dept of Pediatric Dentistry, Post-Graduate Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumbai Central, Mumbai-400 008, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Anesthesiology Topiwala National Medical College, Dr. A. L. Nair Road, Mumbai Central, Mumbai-400 008, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
M Gandhi
B/8 New Purshotam Nagar, Jhari Mari Mandir Road, Bandra West, Mumbai-400 050
India

The safe and effective treatment of uncooperative or combative preschool children with extensive dental needs is one of pediatric dentist«SQ»s ongoing challenges. The traditional methods of behavior management are no longer acceptable to parents as they are not ready to spare more time for dental treatment of their children. Keeping this in mind, the present study was designed and carried out to evaluate the sedative effects of oral ketamine and oral midazolam prior to general anesthesia. Twenty uncooperative children in the age-group of 2-6 years were selected after thorough medical examination and investigations. Informed consent was obtained from the parent. This was a randomized double-blind study. An anesthesiologist administered either 0.5 mg/kg midazolam or 5 mg/kg ketamine orally. The heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation were recorded at regular intervals. The sedation and anxiolysis scores were also recorded. The parents were asked to answer a questionnaire at the follow-up session the next day on the surgical experience of the parent and the child and side effects experienced, if any. When the data was subjected to statistical analysis, it was observed that both drugs resulted in adequate sedation at the end of 30 min, with oral midazolam providing significantly better anxiolysis. The heart rate and respiratory rate were marginally higher with oral ketamine. The questionnaire revealed a better response with oral midazolam; side effects were more prominent with oral ketamine.


How to cite this article:
Damle S G, Gandhi M, Laheri V. Comparison of oral ketamine and oral midazolam as sedative agents in pediatric dentistry.J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent 2008;26:97-101


How to cite this URL:
Damle S G, Gandhi M, Laheri V. Comparison of oral ketamine and oral midazolam as sedative agents in pediatric dentistry. J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent [serial online] 2008 [cited 2021 Feb 28 ];26:97-101
Available from: https://www.jisppd.com/article.asp?issn=0970-4388;year=2008;volume=26;issue=3;spage=97;epage=101;aulast=Damle;type=0