Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry
Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry
                                                   Official journal of the Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry                           
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 195--200

Parental acceptance of pediatric behavior management techniques: A comparative study


I Elango1, DK Baweja2, PK Shivaprakash3 
1 Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, The Oxford Dental College and Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, B.R.S. Dental College and Hospital, Panchkula, Haryana, India
3 Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, PMNM Dental College and Hospital, Bagalkot, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
I Elango
5/26 Thiruvalluvar Nagar, 1st Cross Street, Krishnagiri, Tamilnadu
India

Objectives: To evaluate and compare the attitude toward behavior techniques among parents of healthy and special children in Indian subpopulation. Materials and Methods: Parents of healthy (Group A) and special children (Group B) watched videotape vignette of 10 behavior management techniques (BMTs) in groups and rated them using Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Group B parents were subgrouped as: Group B 1 (34 parents of medically compromised children), Group B 2 (34 parents of physically compromised children), and Group B 3 (34 parents of children with neuropathological disorders). Results: Both Group A and Group B subjects judged all techniques as «DQ»acceptable.«DQ» Group B parents were less accepting to techniques than Group A parents, except live modeling. Contingent escape and live modeling were the first ranked techniques in Group A and Group B parents, respectively. Voice control (VC) and hand-over-mouth exercise (HOM) were the least accepted techniques in both groups. Parents with low income and less education were more receptive to the techniques studied. A total of 25.49% of parents in each group did not consent to the use of HOM. Conclusion: Factors such as having a disabled child, low income, and less education influenced parental acceptability. HOM should be used with great caution and clinicians should approach the issue of informed consent on an individual basis.


How to cite this article:
Elango I, Baweja D K, Shivaprakash P K. Parental acceptance of pediatric behavior management techniques: A comparative study.J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent 2012;30:195-200


How to cite this URL:
Elango I, Baweja D K, Shivaprakash P K. Parental acceptance of pediatric behavior management techniques: A comparative study. J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent [serial online] 2012 [cited 2020 Dec 5 ];30:195-200
Available from: https://www.jisppd.com/article.asp?issn=0970-4388;year=2012;volume=30;issue=3;spage=195;epage=200;aulast=Elango;type=0